Archive for veg

I haven’t been here for a while.

Posted in Recipes, Website of Interest with tags , , , , , on March 17, 2014 by Mrs.Griffin

Garden Fresh Kale

So much of my life has changed in the last four or so years of not posting, lol. But, I won’t bore anyone with the non-relevant details.

I will say, however, I garden now. I may not be excellent at it, but I am learning. And after the snow this year, I lost the majority of my fall harvest. What’s left: brussel sprouts, red cabbage, kale, spinach, strawberries, and onions. Today and yesterday actually felt like spring! So, hubby and I weeded the garden to get ready for new planting. And I collected some spinach and kale

So, ultimately I needed a new kale recipe. After scouring the internet, I found some delicious contenders and ultimately settled with:

**WARNING: THE FOLLOWING RECIPE IS NOT VEGAN**
(but you’d probably figure that out when you got the “butter” and “cheese” part)

Warm Balsamic Kale Salad from Pinch of Yum

And holy moly, people. Don’t walk, run, to make this recipe! It’s an amazing medley of flavors and soooo easy to make…

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • ¼ cup diced onion
  • 1 red pepper, diced
  • 1 yellow pepper, diced
  • 8 oz. baby portobello mushrooms, sliced
  • 4 cups kale
  • 1 teaspoon garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • ¼ cup Asiago cheese
  • salt and pepper to taste
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. In a large skillet over medium heat, melt one tablespoon of butter. Add the onions and peppers; saute for several minutes until softened. Add the mushrooms and one tablespoon butter; saute for several minutes until browned.
  2. Add the kale, garlic, and balsamic vinegar. Saute until the kale is deep green but not yet wilted. Remove from heat and serve topped with Asiago or Parmesan cheese. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

I finished mine off with a bed of Israeli cous-cous.

Now enjoy.

Voila!

Voila!

Delicious Cauliflower Pizza!

Posted in Recipes, vegan substitutes with tags , , , , , , , , , , on March 16, 2014 by Mrs.Griffin

(I just logged in and found this saved to draft…  from March 2011!)

I’m not going to state that I am even capable of posting religiously… but here’s a new recipe 😀

I came a across a blog recently that’s got some great recipes, The Snacking Squirrel. She just posted about some pizza she has made I decided I needed to hop to and make it! It’s got some pretty unique ingredients that I questioned at first, but in the end it was delicious. I changed a few things around from the original recipe and doubled it…

2/3 C Wheat Flour

1/4 C Wheat Bran

4tsp Nutritional Yeast

2tsp Basil

1tsp Oregano

1tsp Thyme

1tsp Baking Powder

1/2tsp Baking Soda

1 Head of Cauliflower, pureed in a food processor

1 C Fat-free Refried Beans

1/4 C Egg Whites

1/5C Water

2tsp Apple Cider Vinegar

Salt

Step One:

The Dry Ingredients

Heat oven to 350 and oil the pan you intend to use.

Step Two:

Mix up your dry ingredients, the flour, wheat bran, nutritional yeast, basil, oregano, thyme, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.

Cauliflower? Really?

Cauliflower? Really?

Step Three:

Mix wet ingredients into a bowl: cauliflower, refried beans, egg whites, water, and apple cider vinegar

Step Four:

Mix wet and dry ingredients together and put batter into a baking pan. Spread out with a spatula. Place in the oven for 20-25 minutes. I actually didn’t let mine  cook long enough and it was rather mushy as an end result, so make sure you cook it enough.

Step Five:

Use your favorite pasta sauce. The original recipe calls for adding salsa, which I did, but it didn’t really suite my taste.

Vegetable Nom-Noms

Vegetable Nom-Noms

Spread pizza crust with sauce and add your favorite toppings. I chose spinach, broccoli, green peppers, and tomatoes. I used mozzarella on half and spread Daiya vegan cheese on the other half.

Step Six: Place pizza back in the oven for another 10-15 minutes till the cheese browns a bit.

Enjoy! You’ll be surprised, my non-vegan friends could not complain.

Deliciousness!

Deliciousness!

How to feed a Veg.

Posted in Noteworthy Info, vegan substitutes with tags , , , , , , , , on February 17, 2009 by Mrs.Griffin

Many people think of vegan like they are space cadets and often wonder how they survive on a daily basis on kale and carrots.  It’s hard to believe that there are options at nearly every restaurant, you just need to get creative, and remember that not everyone eats like you.

Lets start with some definitions:

  • Pescetarian: Someone who doesn’t eat meat but eats fish or seafood.

    Lettuce

    We eat more than lettuce!

  • Flexitarian: A hip and trendy word for what some people call a semi-vegetarian. Someone who isn’t a vegetarian but eats several vegetarian meals a week and might be selective about what types of meat she does eat (such as organic chicken only) and how often.
  • Vegetarian: Someone who doesn’t eat any meat, including poultry, game, fish, and seafood, or any meat by-products, such as broth, gravy, or fat, or foods cooked with meat. A vegetarian may or may not eat other animals products like eggs or dairy (ovo-vegetarians do eat eggs, lacto-vegetarians still eat dairy products, and ovo-lacto vegetarians eats both eggs and dairy).
  • Vegan: A strict vegetarian (see above) who doesn’t eat anything that comes from an animal—no meat, dairy products, eggs, honey or other animal by-products.

See  there are a range of options that are based on individuals comfort-ability with the situation.  Knowing the basics will help you to understand, here are some basic Do’s and Don’ts:

The Do’s and Don’ts

  • DO be honest. Please don’t try to sneak meat, broth, or seafood into a vegetarian‘s food – that’s just rude and a bit selfish. If you put bacon in the broccoli salad, chicken broth in the risotto, or lard in the pie crust, tell your guests.
  • DO invite them. I would have invited you, but I didn’t think you’d…feel comfortable, eat anything I served, enjoy yourself, etc. Even a serious lack of veggie-friendly food isn’t going to stop the fun if the people and atmosphere are warm and inviting.
  • DON’T apologize. You eat meat. Some people don’t. You don’t have to apologize for eating meat in front of a vegetarian.
  • DON’T make a big deal about it. Vegetarians have various reasons for not eating meat, but some of those reasons might not be ideal dinner table or cocktail party discussions. Perhaps save the discussion for another time.
  • DON’T be afraid to ask questions. Ask what foods your guest eats and likes. Perhaps you’ll find a new family favorite or elevate a vegetable from side dish to entrée status.
  • DO ask your guest to bring a dish. Most vegetarians have experience cooking for themselves. Let them bring food to share, if they wish. Many will do it without being asked.
  • DON’T be offended if he brings food. Many vegetarians don’t want to complicate your duties as host. They will often bring something they know they can eat and share with others, so don’t take it personally.
  • DO cook enough food. Make sure there is enough of the vegetarian dish for everyone to try (because they will) and for the vegetarians to take seconds.

The last is soooo important.  I only cook vegan dishes when I am bringing something with me and everyone ends up loving it!  I wait till after they’ve all scarfed it down to reveal my big secret.  I think it helps remove the stigma that it’s all tasteless food.

One great idea idea if you are having a party is to set the food out on a bar – let people create the meal they want with the ingredients they enjoy!  Just because you’re having a burritos, doesn’t mean you have to leave out your vegetable loving friends!  Tortillas, beans, sauteed veggies can be used just the same – and keep in mind that there are PLENTY of vegan substitutes – for even ground beef, chicken, and don’t forget the sour cream and veggie cheese!

Or how ’bout a pizza party, or yummy [wheat] pasta…  Just always keep in mind that you should have enough utensils on hand to accommodate all dishes.

More Ideas for Those who Have a Vegetarian at Home

  • Learn where meat hides. Sometimes meat sneaks in to foods that you wouldn’t suspect. Some common foods that contain meat or seafood: Caesar dressing (anchovies), Thai curry and many Asian dishes (fish sauce), and canned “vegetable” soups (beef or chicken broth).
  • Salads are great. Serve a large green salad before or with the meal, which ensures a healthful option for all. With a couple of hard-boiled eggs or a handful of nuts, that salad can be elevated to a vegetarian entrée.
  • Where’s the beef? Try to offer a balanced meal. Vegetarians sometimes have to be creative to get adequate protein, calcium, and nutrients. Help them out by serving a balanced meal where plant-based proteins (chickpeas, black beans, or lentils) fill in the place where meat might have been. This boosts the protein content, filling power, and helps round out a meal. Beans and legumes are a cheap and easy way to add vegetarian-friendly foods to a meal. Open, rinse, heat, and eat.

The lesson – don’t be intimidated when it comes to feeding us, we generally eat the sames things you do, just with a little more creativity.